Georgetown Day School, a prestigious private school at which Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson sits on the board, had children perform a play with adult sexual content and encouraged fourth-graders to participate in left-wing activism.

Jackson has already been tied to the school’s promotion of cultural Marxism in which it boasts a far-left curriculum including a course on “‘Exploring Reproductive Justice,’ and a 9th Grade Seminar ‘flagship social justice course that serves as a launching point for a GDS High School Education.'”


In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, when many students were condemned to “remote learning,” Georgetown Day School’s drama department put on a musical rendition of the sexually explicit 1906 German play Spring Awakening, which explores adolescent sexual experimentation.

The musical “is not only about sexual awakening, but perhaps more so about self-discovery,” Georgetown Day School High School Performing Arts Department Chair Laura Rosberg said in a disclaimer to potential audience members. “I’ve enjoyed the irony of a story about intimacy at a time when kids can’t be intimate.”

Children not being “intimate” on stage appears only to be a result of coronavirus restrictions requiring that they be a certain distance away from one another. Were those not in place, it appears that “sex and kissing scenes” might have been performed with physical touch.

“Due to GDS’ COVID restrictions, the actors were still not allowed to touch each other,” the Augur Bit — the school’s student newspaper — said. “They were instructed to substitute acts like kissing with sign language gestures and had to rely on their acting skills to show intimacy while maintaining distance.”

“Sex and kissing scenes were mimed with choreographed motions, making them appear dance-like,” another Bit article said, noting that “the change was made out of necessity due to COVID restrictions.”

The play that featured songs such as “Touch Me” and “The Word of Your Body,” “Totally Fucked,” and “The Bitch of Living” kept “counsellors on call” for the student actors, according to Rosberg. [sic]

According to the student paper, some students and staff had “reservations” about doing the play.

“Being more exposed and immersed in what we were doing, I got a little bit desensitized,” one of the actresses, a junior, said. “But the subject matter is still very heavy.” Technical Director Christal Boyd also voiced concerns.

“While the show is about the very mature themes mentioned above, the much-needed messages contained in the program are especially meaningful during this pandemic in which we‘ve grieved death and experienced loneliness and loss,” Rosberg said.

The school cautioned that potential viewers of the play should likely be in eighth grade or above.

Fourth graders at Georgetown Day School also appear to have been forced into performative, left-wing activism in an assembly called “Free to Be Me.”

In this, fourth-graders were told to give presentations celebrating “LGBTQ+ voices,” and at one point promoted Black Lives Matter, with one-fourth grader saying, “During the Civil Rights Movement, people of all races marched to change unfair laws. People are still protesting for racial justice as part of the Black Lives Matter movement.”

Fourth-grade teacher Julia Tomasko explained the assembly, saying, “In these scenes, the students learn about pride, activism, and what it means to be an ally.”

“In order to center and uplift LGBTQ+ voices, the scenes are inspired by lessons we taught, as well as the experience and knowledge of students and staff in the community,” she said.

After explaining what the acronym “LGBTQ+” means, one fourth-grader said, “there are many, many more identities in the LGBTQ+ community that we haven’t learned enough about yet. They are important and we will learn more.”

One of the central themes of the presentation was that being an “ally” was not enough, favoring activism.

“Now let’s look at a quote from Audrey Lorde, a famous poet and activist who described herself as black, lesbian mother, warrior poet,” one fourth-grader said. “She said, ‘You do not have to be me in order for us to fight alongside each other.'”

Yet another fourth-grader said, “being an ally is all about showing up pushing back and taking action.”

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