The man who used to own the Delaware computer repair shop where Hunter Biden left his notorious “laptop from hell” says bankruptcy looms, as his life has been turned upside down by private citizens, tech giants, and federal agencies since the contents of the laptop became public.

John Paul Mac Isaac, 45, tells the New York Post that he received a slew of death threats after the bombshell revelations on Biden’s laptop became public and noted a Wilmington state trooper had to maintain a constant presence outside of his shop in Trolley Square.


He added:

There were multiple situations where people came in and you could tell they were not there to have a computer fixed. And if there were not other people in the shop, I don’t know what would have happened. I was having vegetables, eggs, dog s–t thrown at the shop every morning.

Mac Isaac previously told Breitbart News that Hunter Biden dropped the computer off at his shop on April 12, 2019, to conduct a “data recovery.” He says he called Biden the next day to inform him the recovery was completed, but Hunter never picked it up.

“I became concerned over some of the content I was viewing,” Mac Isaac told Breitbart News. He informed the FBI of the device before bringing it to former New York City Mayor Rudy Guiliani. Eventually, the New York Post came into possession of the laptop’s contents and published a series of reports on them in October 2020, in the lead-up to the 2020 election — which was extensively covered by Breitbart news.

“The laptop reportedly contained emails detailing Hunter Biden’s businesses with Burisma, a Ukrainian natural gas company, and potential business deals with a Chinese energy company,” Breitbart News reported.

Mac Issac tells the Post that the circumstances surrounding his involvement with the laptop devolved into such chaos that he had to close his shop, and noted that on November 5, 2020 — just two days after the presidential election — he took off for Lakewood, Colorado. The 45-year-old says he stayed there with his family for about a year and took classes in woodworking.

Mac Isaac tells the Post he applied for unemployment in December of 2020, though his unemployment cases were repeatedly closed and he had to use his 401k funds to cover bills. He then sent a letter to Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE), a close ally of President Joe Biden, last December.

“I would hate to think that I was singled out in a politically motivated attack. If a state agency was weaponized to punish a perceived political enemy, the country has a right to know,” he wrote to Coons, according to the Post. Following the letter, he began receiving unemployment funds, though he says it ended up being a few thousand short of what he was owed.

Making matters worse, Mac Isaac sued Twitter over the platform’s censorship of stories regarding Hunter Biden’s laptop, according to the Post. Six months after the filing, a Florida judge dismissed the case with prejudice and ordered Mac Isaac to cover Twitter’s legal fees, which he says is in the ballpark of $175,000.

“Bankruptcy looks like my only option,” he tells the Post, noting he now does odd jobs. “A buddy of mine does estate clean outs, manual labor. I helped a neighbor redo their porch and I’m trying to do more with woodworking.”

Moreover, Mac Isaac told the Post that last September, he received an IRS invoice regarding his tax return from 2016, which he took as a threat. When he showed it to an accountant pal, his friend noted that the agency does not “go back that far unless they’re looking for something,” Mac Isaac says. He swiftly paid the sum of nearly $60, the Post reports. He noted that he had seen the progressive weaponization of the IRS over the past decade and decided not to contest the agency.

Throughout 2021, Mac Isaac says Facebook censored his posts on the platform, leading to a suspension in September, before He successfully appealed the determination, the Post reports.

The former computer technician now finds himself in uncharted territory. He has written a book chronicling his life since the laptop’s revelations went public, but he has not found a publisher willing to work with him, the Post notes. Though his life has been upended, he says he would do it again.

“If I had the choice to do it again, I would absolutely do it again,” he told the Post. “I was raised since 9/11 to believe if you see something you say something.”

No comments:

Post a Comment