As if the U.S. were not in bad enough shape militarily, China has a little surprise for us.

Here's the buried news item from Politico's national security newsletter, dated Jan. 11:

A "SURPRISE" IN THE PACIFIC: U.S. Indo-Pacific coordinator KURT CAMPBELL says the region could be in store for a "strategic surprise" — comments that Reuters' DAVID BRUNNSTROM and KIRSTY NEEDHAM describe as "apparently referring to possible Chinese ambitions to establish Pacific-island bases."

"If you look and if you ask me, where are the places where we are most likely to see certain kinds of strategic surprise — basing or certain kinds of agreements or arrangements — it may well be in the Pacific," Campbell said Monday at a Center for Strategic and International Studies event.

"We have a very short amount of time, working with partners like Australia, like New Zealand, like Japan, like France, who have an interest in the Pacific, to step up our game across the board," Campbell added, revealing it was the issue he is "most concerned about" for the next couple years.

As if the U.S. were not in bad enough shape militarily, China has a little surprise for us.

Here's the buried news item from Politico's national security newsletter, dated Jan. 11:

A "SURPRISE" IN THE PACIFIC: U.S. Indo-Pacific coordinator KURT CAMPBELL says the region could be in store for a "strategic surprise" — comments that Reuters' DAVID BRUNNSTROM and KIRSTY NEEDHAM describe as "apparently referring to possible Chinese ambitions to establish Pacific-island bases."

"If you look and if you ask me, where are the places where we are most likely to see certain kinds of strategic surprise — basing or certain kinds of agreements or arrangements — it may well be in the Pacific," Campbell said Monday at a Center for Strategic and International Studies event.

"We have a very short amount of time, working with partners like Australia, like New Zealand, like Japan, like France, who have an interest in the Pacific, to step up our game across the board," Campbell added, revealing it was the issue he is "most concerned about" for the next couple years.

Kiribati is a longtime friendly U.S. ally with close relations dating back to World War II.  All of a sudden, we seem to have lost that relationship, with the Biden administration mismanaging it.  Now Kiribati has gone off and allowed China to build its airstrip, and analysts such as Campbell, cited above, consider this a likely platform for a "strategic surprise."

Campbell warned that it was the issue he is "most concerned about in the next year or two," but then, from the Reuters report, he went on to spout nonsense about putting Kiribati on a "green energy" program as a supposed solution.  That's part of the problem.  None of these things has anything to do with strategic superiority; pricey green energy is all part of the wokester madness that has gripped the military-industrial-consultant complex, with everything from pronouns to "green bullets" taking precedence over actual military superiority.

That's what we are stuck with as Joe Biden gets us bogged down in wokester military tripe with failed Gen. Mark Milley there to scare our enemies.  He's also focused and bogged down in Ukraine, even sending Kamala Harris to get underfoot at a big conference in Europe, as the Europeans try to handle the matter.  

While all that has his limited attention span in thrall, the Chicoms have gotten busy, and analysts like Campbell say they've got a surprise for us. 

I have no idea how they are going to solve this, given that so much has been ignored and mismanaged in the run-up.  But what we have now is the U.S. being boxed in and losing even its strategic advantage through its Hawaiian vantage point.  That suggests that the surprise could be ugly, and this won't end well for us so long as we have a walking corpse unaware of anything going on beyond his porridge now padding the halls of the Oval Office. 

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