Around the world, thousands of people have been standing up for freedom by taking to the streets to protest tyrannical covid public health measures, including vaccine mandates, health passports and lockdowns. Some of the places that have seen major demonstrations include Austria, Italy, Croatia, France, the Netherlands, Germany, the UK and Northern Ireland in Europe, as well as cities across Japan, Australia, the U.S. and Canada.

Austria

In Austria, as many as 40,000 people took to the streets in Vienna while chanting “freedom “ and “resistance” after the government issued a draconian nationwide vaccine mandate that requires everyone in the country to get the jab by February 1. A nationwide lockdown was implemented in which those who cannot prove they have been vaccinated or recently recovered from the disease were barred from leaving their homes, with police carrying out spot checks not only in restaurants but also parks. Days later, however, the government imposed a full national lockdown that will last at least 20 days.

Although the protests were mostly peaceful, some groups of demonstrators clashed with police and at least five were arrested. The populist Freedom Party helped organize the protests. A regional party leader, Udo Landbauer, said: “We are all Austrians, regardless of whether we are vaccinated or not vaccinated. We have rights, and we will continue to be loud until we get our basic rights back.”

Croatia

One of the biggest recent protests is believed to be one that was held in Zagreb, the capital of Croatia, this month. As many as 100,000 people are estimated to have flooded the streets in protest of the government’s new COVID-19 measures, which include mandatory vaccines for workers in the public sectors as well as health passports. People there were heard chanting “We are not giving you our children.”

Belgium

Tens of thousands of people marched in the Belgian capital of Brussels in protest of COVID-19 measures. The main point of contention is the use of covid passes to exclude unvaccinated people from participating in society. Rules on face masks were recently tightened there, and most Belgians are being ordered to work from home four days per week until at least the middle of December. Meanwhile, a vaccine mandate for health workers is in the works.

The Netherlands

The Netherlands has also been home to protests, some of which have been peaceful, while others have grown violent and led to rioting. An emergency order was announced in the city, and multiple people were arrested for their behavior. The protests come as the Netherlands imposes a three-week partial lockdown as COVID-19 cases spike there. Rotterdam was the site of one of the most intense rallies that turned into riots as demonstrators clashed with police.

Italy

Thousands of demonstrators headed for the Circus Maximus in Rome to protest the Green Pass certificates that are now required at workplaces, gyms, public transportation, sports venues, cinemas and restaurants in the country. One protester carried a sign that said, “People like us never give up.”

Australia

Australia, which has seen some of the toughest lockdown measures and extreme restrictions in the world for unvaccinated people, has been the site of regular weekend demonstrations. In Melbourne’s central business district, thousands of protesters gathered to oppose the proposed pandemic laws and vaccination policies, gathering on the parliament steps before making their way through city streets with signs and flags. Victoria police estimate that more than 20,000 people attended Saturday’s protest. Some of those present said they had lost their jobs after refusing to get the jab.

The protest came just a week after rallies were held in several Australian cities in an intentional day of protest against lockdowns and vaccine mandates. Protests were also seen this weekend in Western Australia, the Gold Coast and Sydney.

Ireland

In Ireland, a protest against virus restrictions and vaccine passports attracted thousands of people over the weekend. Speakers at the event accused the government of being corrupt and attempting to control people’s lives; some said they felt the measures were worse than the disease itself.

Around the world, people are making it clear they strongly believe in preserving their lives and liberty. The pushback is particularly pronounced in Europe, where populations generally tend to be more compliant than Americans in terms of unquestionably obeying government orders. The type of discontent that is brewing among people around the world on account of governmental tyranny is, as Zero Hedge’s “Tyler Durden” points out, often a precursor to revolutions, and it could mean the world is headed down a very dangerous path if governments continue to take away people’s basic liberties.

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