Injecting kids with Pfizer’s mRNA vaccine appears to be increasingly reckless and dangerous following the admission of Dr. Anthony Fauci that a “significant proportion” of Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) patients in hospitals are fully vaccinated.

A growing number of organizations are questioning if it is worth exposing kids to adverse reactions of the Pfizer vaccine since the risk of severe illness and death for kids from COVID-19 is close to zero.

Investigative journalist Steve Kirsch noted that babies born to fully vaccinated mothers are struggling with heart problems in intensive care units throughout the United States.

While admitting that there is still no long-term data regarding this situation, Kirsh noted that Pfizer monitored the children in their COVID vaccine trials for only four months following the second dose.

Highly-respected Stanford University professor and physician Dr. John Ioannidis described in his article published by the Brownstone Institute that the COVID-19 survival rate of people under 70 years old is 99.5 percent, while the risk of a child spreading the virus or becoming seriously ill with the disease is extremely rare.

Ioannidis also compiled data showing that the estimated COVID fatality rate for children and young adults is close to zero.

The article stated: “The risk-benefit discussion for children with these COVID-19 injections is a very different one than that for adults. This is a completely novel and experimental injection therapy with no medium or long-term safety data (or even definitive effectiveness data). If we move forward with the vaccination of our children without the proper safety testing, then we will present them with potentially catastrophic risk, including deaths in some.”

Another mRNA vaccine – Moderna’s – has been associated with heart inflammation.

Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Norway, Germany and France banned the use of Moderna’s mRNA vaccine in people younger than 30 years old after observing that there’s an increased risk of heart inflammation for young adults after vaccination. 

Yet, majority of officials still insist that the benefits of the COVID vaccine outweigh the risks and remain relatively mum about the need for individuals to weigh their unique risk profile before deciding to consent to a medical procedure such as taking an experimental vaccine.

In the U.S., public health officials are currently waiting on whether to allow Moderna’s mRNA shots to be injected into children.

Five cases of omicron detected in New York

Meanwhile, government leaders have found another excuse to push the vaccine and booster shots to Americans as the omicron variant officially arrived in the country.

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul said five cases of the omicron coronavirus variant have been detected in the state.

“New York State has confirmed five cases of the omicron variant,” she said on Twitter. “Let me be clear: This is not cause for alarm. We knew this variant was coming and we have the tools to stop the spread. Get your vaccine. Get your booster. Wear your mask.”

Hochul said authorities “still don’t have specific information on how the vaccines [and] the boosters are holding up” against the new variant, which was first reported by South Africa to the World Health Organization about a week ago.

“While this may be highly transmissible, at least from the early evidence, and again more information is still forthcoming, we want people to know that the early cases that have arisen are not life-threatening, they seem to be minor cases and that is a source of good news for us right now,” she added.

The cases are from Suffolk Country, Queens and Brooklyn.

Earlier on Thursday, Dec. 2, Minnesota health authorities confirmed the second case of the omicron variant in a person who recently returned from New York City after attending the Anime NYC convention at the Javits Center. The person experienced mild symptoms.

A third U.S. case of the variant was detected in a female resident of Arapahoe County in Colorado, who recently traveled to South Africa. She’s fully vaccinated.

The first case was confirmed in California on Nov. 30 in a person who returned to San Francisco from South Africa.

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