A Virginia hospital has yielded to a court order and allowed ivermectin to be given to a patient infected with the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19). The medical facility permitted the use of the anti-parasitic drug after a judge threatened fines of $10,000 per day.

The move was a victory for the family of Kathy Davies, who has been receiving COVID-19 treatment for several months at Fauquier Health in Warrenton, Virginia. Her husband and son launched a legal battle against the hospital earlier in December 2021 to allow the use of ivermectin on her.

Davies’ family decided to take action after the hospital’s standard protocols – which included placing her on a ventilator – did not improve her condition. An anonymous friend of the family said Fauquier Health had also been giving her remdesivir, which is said to increase the risk of causing the liver and kidneys to fail.

The Davies family explored the possibility of ivermectin following the initial recommendation of family physician Dr. Martha Maturi. However, Fauquier Health rejected the proposal – leading to Davies’ relatives taking legal action. A back-and-forth legal battle between the hospital and the family led to an initial Dec. 9 court ruling that ordered the use of ivermectin, which the hospital refused to obey.

A later judgment on Dec. 13 from Circuit Court Judge James P. Fisher found that Fauquier Health was in contempt of court for refusing to allow ivermectin for Davies. According to the Daily Wire, the judge gave the hospital three choices: comply, appeal the court order or face the $10,000 per day fine. The fines would be retroactively imposed beginning Dec. 9.


Fauquier Health finally complied with the court order on Dec. 13, permitting Maturi to administer ivermectin to Davies after 41 days on a ventilator. She received her first dose on the same day and is set to continue treatment using the drug.

“Kathy just started on her ivermectin last night, and that’s by the power of prayer,” the family friend told LifeSiteNews in a Dec. 14 phone interview. 

Hospital didn’t bother to look into ivermectin

In his Dec. 13 ruling, Fisher argued that Fauquier Health had inadequate reasons to block the ivermectin treatment. He also pointed out that the hospital did not bother to conduct “an analysis of the merits of ivermectin as a treatment protocol.” Thus, Fisher concluded that the hospital would need to make “all reasonable effort” to facilitate the treatment Davies’ family seeks.

In a Dec. 15 statement, Fauquier Health said Maturi did not have privileges to practice at the hospital. It added that they could not allow her a physician who is not a staff member to administer medication as it would “violate standard practice and Virginia law.”

“We believe that we have navigated these complexities as swiftly as possible and have remained in compliance with standard hospital practice, including federal and state regulations, throughout this matter. In fact, we proactively took steps above and beyond the family’s requests, the suggestions of their legal counsel, and the court’s order to make the desired accommodations,” the hospital said.

Dr. Pierre Kory, president of the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance, commented on the ruling by Fisher. He tweeted: “Now, it’s their turn to pay instead of the patient. One hospital will owe $50,000 if ivermectin [is] not given by 9 p.m. Gee, I wonder what they’ll do?” 

Kory subsequently tweeted: “[I] just heard the hospital [administrators] were freaking out trying to get [a registered nurse] to give ivermectin by 9 p.m. Nothing like $50,000 and a PR nightmare facing you, versus just another COVID patient dying from a care standard set by profits and supported by the craven, or ignorant complicity of most medical doctors.”

The friend of the Davies family told LifeSiteNews that the victory against Fauquier Health will help other families in similar situations who wish to try ivermectin or other therapeutic drugs to treat COVID-19.

“People are just going to the hospital and they’re just [getting] the same protocol that everyone’s going through,” she said.



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