Amazon experienced a “record-breaking” Thanksgiving weekend as other retailers struggled.

According to a blog post from the company, the period between Black Friday and Cyber Monday saw high degrees of consumer activity in categories such as toys, apparel, and electronics:

Customers discover savings on Amazon during the holiday season—and every day. According to a recent study from independent analyst firm Profitero, Amazon had the lowest prices by an average of 14% compared to all major retailers across every category coming into the holidays.

Amazon is proud to make customers’ holiday celebrations easier by offering a wide selection of incredible deals and low prices with convenient delivery and pick-up options. Amazon also looks forward to delivering smiles through the rest of the holiday season and beyond. The holiday season — and every day of the year at Amazon — is made possible by our employees, delivery drivers, in-store staff, and the nearly two-million small and medium-sized businesses among our independent selling partners who continue to deliver a great shopping experience for our customers around the world.

Despite Amazon’s apparent success, other retailers lagged, according to CNBC:

U.S. shoppers spent $10.7 billion on Cyber Monday, according to data from Adobe Analytics, marking a 1.4% decline from year-ago levels. Black Friday online sales also fell slightly short of last year’s total, with retailers recording $8.9 billion in sales, Adobe said.

While shopping at physical stores rose substantially from last year, when the pandemic kept consumers glued to the couch, traffic was down 28% from 2019 levels, according to preliminary data from Sensormatic Solutions.

Citing another study, CNBC added that Amazon alone captured 17.7% of Black Friday dollars. More details about Amazon’s sales will be made public in the firm’s fourth-quarter earnings report, due for release early next year.

Despite its success in the retail space, Amazon has been accused of censoring conservative-leaning products.

In September, the Heritage Foundation announced that Amazon pulled promotions for the book “BLM: The Making of a New Marxist Revolution” — a deep-dive by Heritage Senior Fellow Mike Gonzalez into the Black Lives Matter movement.

Amazon told Heritage that the book “no longer complies with our current Creative Acceptance Policies,” because: “Your ad contains book/s or content that is not allowed. Content that revolves around controversial or highly debated social topics is not permitted. Please remove this content from your ad.”

After Heritage officials appealed, Amazon reversed its decision, claiming that it had not properly enforced its own policies.

Meanwhile, a book version of Nikole Hannah-Jones’ “1619 Project” reached the top of Amazon’s bestseller list before its release. The New York Times journalist’s arguments, however, have been widely denounced by historians who argued that it lacks nuance and ignores necessary context regarding the United States’ struggle with slavery.

“I was disturbed by what seemed like a very unbalanced, one-sided account, which lacked context and perspective on the complexity of slavery, which was clearly, obviously, not an exclusively American institution, but existed throughout history,” Pulitzer-Prize winning author and Princeton University history professor James McPherson explained.

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