Kyle Rittenhouse said this week that he has “no interest” in getting into politics, and revealed that he’s even considering a name change to help foster some anonymity.

The teenager, acquitted Friday, has been speaking out about his side of the story. Notably, Rittenhouse was smeared as a “murderer,” a “vigilante,” and even a “white supremacist” by media elites and prominent politicians.

But as far as politics goes, the 18-year-old has no interest in the avenue as a career choice.

During a sit-down interview with Ashleigh Banfield on NewsNation Now, Rittenhouse was asked about internship offers he’s received from congressional Republicans.

“I do not plan on accepting any internships,” the teen said. “I don’t want to get involved in politics at all. I know nothing about it. And I thank everyone for their support, but I’m good, thank you,” he laughed.

Banfield then asked Rittenhouse if he wanted to “carry the banner” for any particular political cause.

“No, I don’t have any interest in that,” Rittenhouse responded. “Because, to me, this case is about the right to self-defense, not where you fall Left or Right.”

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Rittenhouse also revealed during the interview that he is considering changing his name, likely to help protect his safety and allow the 18-year-old to go on to live a quiet life. In the past, the teen has revealed that he is going to school to become a nurse.

“I am considering changing my name, growing a beard maybe,” Rittenhouse laughed, “losing some weight. I gained it all back during this stressful time.”

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On Friday, Rittenhouse was acquitted by a jury on all charges against him related to a deadly riot in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last year.

Appearing in a teaser clip for a documentary from Fox News host Tucker Carlson, Rittenhouse said the jury “reached the right verdict.”

“Self-defense is not illegal, and I believe they came to the correct verdict, and I’m glad that everything went well.”

“It’s been a rough journey, but we made it through it,” the 18-year-old said. “We made it through the hard part.”

The special follows the teenager through the last year after he fatally shot two attackers and injured a third while defending himself at a Black Lives Matter protest that devolved into a riot. The teen was facing life in prison with no chance at parole.

“It’s the stuff that keeps you up at night, like once you do get to sleep, your dreams are about what happened and you’re waking up in a dark cold sweat,” the teenager revealed to Carlson’s crew.

Rittenhouse said he has dreams about the deadly night “every single night.”

“It’s quite scary actually, because the dreams feel so real. And they’re not the same at all, they’re all different. They’re the different scenarios that run through your heard during the day, like, what could have happened,” he detailed.

“I’m alive, but what could have happened, like what if I wasn’t alive, or what if I did let Mr. Rosenbaum steal my gun? It’s those types of dreams … almost every outcome is either me getting seriously injured or hurt or dead. Those are just the dreams I have on a daily basis.”

It was revealed during the trial by Rittenhouse’s defense attorney Mark Richards that the teenager is in therapy for the PTSD he suffers from, stemming from the night of August 25, 2020.

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