The National Sex Education Standards' updated 2020 guidance is featuring what many parents may consider to be disturbing, indoctrinating sex-related information that public school districts are teaching children from very young ages.

The new standards, according to the report, were conceived by the Future of Sex Education Initiative, a partnership between Advocates for Youth, Answer, and SIECUS: Sex Ed for Social Change that seeks to "create a national dialogue about the future of sex education and to promote the institutionalization of quality sex education in public school."

What are the details?

According to a Tuesday report from the Federalist's Nick Bell, the sex education "blueprint" is steeped in "extremist sexual ethics" that are "designed to destroy children's innocence" as well as undermine their Christian faith.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a 2016 report noted that approximately 40% of school districts across the country adopted the National Sex Education Standards' 2011 edition — a less extreme version of its 2020 successor.

"The 2020 standards unequivocally endorse abortion at any time, teach the topic starting in sixth grade, and even force teachers to provide information on local abortion clinics to students in ninth grade," Bell wrote. "The standards also insist that children must be allowed to choose their own gender and false pronouns must 'be respected by the adults in their lives.'"

According to the new standards, children as young as kindergarten age should learn about gender identity, while third-grade students should learn about the role of hormone blockers for transgender youth. Teachers should also be equipped to explain masturbation to students as young as just eight years old.

It gets worse from there: Bell noted that sixth-graders — who are often 11 and 12 years old — "must define oral, anal, and vaginal sex as well as the benefits of withdrawing one's penis before ejaculation during intercourse."

Sixth-graders, the groups said, should also learn that people ought not "assume that people with a penis are boys and people with a vagina are girls," and that they should never assume another person's sexual orientation. Students of this age group, according to the guidance, should also attend LGBTQ rallies and challenge themselves and others on ways to combat homophobia. Sixth-graders would also engage in a card game in which cards ask whether various sex acts — "oral sex (mouth on genitals)," "anal sex (penis to anus)" — are considered abstinence.'

For seventh-graders, anything but "sperm in vagina" would constitute abstinence, the guidance added, and teachers would demonstrate how to put on a condom.

A lesson for eighth-graders, the guidance added, would encourage anal and oral sex over vaginal sex in order to avoid pregnancy.

What else?

The new standards, according to the organization, were "written with a trauma-informed lens; have been infused with principles of reproductive justice, racial justice, social justice, and equity; address social determinants of health and how these can lead to inequitable health outcomes; and take an intersectional approach. This edition uses less cis and heteronormative language that reflects a broader range of relationships and identities."

The updated standards also appear to place parental consent on the back burner and encourage children to demand respect from the adults in their lives when it comes to sexual choice.

“No one else is qualified to label or judge another person's sexual identity, including their sexual orientation or gender identity, and it is important that the language and terms young people use to identify themselves is respected by the adults in their lives," a portion of the report added.

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