Former President Donald Trump says he supports parents protesting at local school boards against administrators who seek to teach Critical Race Theory while denouncing claims that those doing the demonstrating are 'terrorists.'

'I've been watching the school board hearings more closely than I ever have, to be honest, and it's so interesting,' the former president told Fox News on Saturday.

'The parents are incensed. They're not terrorists. They're people that are just so upset.'

Trump was commenting on the controversy surrounding the Loudoun County school board in Virginia, where a parent whose child was the victim of a sexual assault was dragged out of a meeting and arrested after administrators refused to believe his claims.

A judge later ruled that his daughter was indeed assaulted in a school - prompting the head of the school board to apologize.

The former president said parents are also mobilized to prevent schools from teaching racial content. 

'They're angry. They're hurt. They're crying because their children are being taught things that - in our opinion, in my opinion, in the vast majority of the people in this country's opinion - they don't want their children to hear about this stuff,' Trump said.

Former President Donald Trump says he supports parents protesting at local school boards against administrators who seek to teach Critical Race Theory while denouncing claims that those doing the demonstrating are 'terrorists'

Former President Donald Trump says he supports parents protesting at local school boards against administrators who seek to teach Critical Race Theory while denouncing claims that those doing the demonstrating are 'terrorists'

Trump was commenting on the controversy surrounding the Loudoun County school board in Virginia, where a parent whose child was the victim of a sexual assault was dragged out of a meeting after administrators refused to believe his claims. A raucous school board meeting was held in Loudoun County on June 22

Trump was commenting on the controversy surrounding the Loudoun County school board in Virginia, where a parent whose child was the victim of a sexual assault was dragged out of a meeting after administrators refused to believe his claims. A raucous school board meeting was held in Loudoun County on June 22

'They want to go back to reading, writing, and arithmetic, and they want to hear that black people are good, and they want to hear that white people are good.

'This is the division that is being caused by these programs.'

Trump predicted that the controversy surrounding the schools would boost Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin's chances of winning Tuesday's election.

Youngkin is running against the Democratic former governor, Terry McAuliffe.  

'I think he's going to do very well,' Trump said of Youngkin.

The former president hit out at McAuliffe for saying that parents should have no say in what their children are taught in school. 

'McAuliffe made a tremendous mistake. It's not a tremendous mistake from his standpoint,' Trump said.

'He believes it.'

Trump said McAuliffe's statement would be just as 'bad' as Hillary Clinton's infamous comment calling supporters of the former president 'deplorables.'

'I think this is going to cause him tremendous problems come Tuesday,'

Trump predicted that the Democratic strategy of linking Youngkin with him would backfire.


He said that if 'my base' turns out on Tuesday, the GOP candidate will win. Polls currently show Youngkin with a slight lead over McAuliffe. 

The school board meetings have turned into political battlegrounds nationwide as a group of GOP-aligned parents stage protests claiming their children are being indoctrinated with progressive ideology.

Minnesota school board chairwoman stirred outrage last week after she demanded that parents announce their home address if they want to speak at public meetings - the latest flashpoint in the ongoing battle over the right to question administrators about COVID restrictions, CRT curriculums or any other controversial topics.

Jodi Sapp, the chairwoman of the Mankato school board, opened the meeting on October 18 by telling parents they cannot ask any questions unless they revealed their home address, according to the now viral video.

'Each speaker is asked to state his or her name and home address for the record. Failure to do so will result in an individual not being allowed to speak,' Sapp read aloud.

Glenn Youngkin
Terry McAuliffe

Trump predicted that the controversy surrounding the schools would boost Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin's (left) chances of winning Tuesday's election. Youngkin is running against the Democratic former governor, Terry McAuliffe (right)

'Each speaker is allowed three minutes to speak, and the board will alert the speaker when their time is up. Failure to stop speaking (in time) will result in the ability to participate in future open forums.' 

John Wicklund, a dad who at first refused to give his personal information before finally having to cave in, asked Sapp: 'Do you consider us terrorists? Like a couple members have said online.'

'Seems like we are, especially with the opening statements.'   

The father's question was in reference to a memo sent last week by the National School Boards Association that likened some parents of school children who have protested their child's curriculum to domestic terrorists

The group has since apologized for the letter but not before Attorney General applauded the missive and called for the FBI to investigate such parents.


Pictured: chairwoman of the Mankato school board Jodi Sapp, who can be seen in the viral video telling a man that he cannot speak unless he announced his home address during an October 18 meeting

Pictured: chairwoman of the Mankato school board Jodi Sapp, who can be seen in the viral video telling a man that he cannot speak unless he announced his home address during an October 18 meeting

Mankato resident John Wicklund, pictured center with cap, was forced to publicly state his home address in order to speak during the school district's open forum on October 18

Mankato resident John Wicklund, pictured center with cap, was forced to publicly state his home address in order to speak during the school district's open forum on October 18

Parents forced to announce address before speaking at school meeting
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Wicklund, voiced his objections, but eventually provided his home address after attempting to negate doing so by citing concerns that his home could be targeted for vandalism.  

'My name is John Wicklund and I live in Mankato,' he began.

'Could I get your address please, John,' Sapp responded.

'I'd rather not, since I get so much property damage and eggs and everything else from... fun people and their friends.'

'John you need to give your address,' she repeated.

'I live on 5th Street,' he reluctantly said, before being allowed to ask questions.

'How many acts of violence (have occurred on school grounds)? How many sexual assaults have happened in this school district?'

'You can say the (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) are making you do this, but the government knows better.'

Sapp did not answer the dad in the video, giving him a curt 'thank you, that's the end of the open forum'.

The open forum's policy change came after the school board's October 4 meeting, where a number of parents criticized the school district mask's mandate and vaccination policies, causing audience members to loudly applaud the community speakers.  

School board meetings nationwide have become the battleground for parents and district officials in recent months, with many parents using the board meetings to protest the teaching of critical race theory and other controversial educational topics.   

The Mankato meeting remained civil despite the testy moment between Sapp and Wicklund, however outrage did spill over onto social media after the video of their exchange went viral. 

'John you need to give your address,' Sapp told the man. 'I live on 5th Street,' Wicklund reluctantly replied

'John you need to give your address,' Sapp told the man. 'I live on 5th Street,' Wicklund reluctantly replied

The open forum's policy change came after the school board's October 4 meeting, where a number of parents criticized the school district mask's mandate and vaccination policies

The open forum's policy change came after the school board's October 4 meeting, where a number of parents criticized the school district mask's mandate and vaccination policies

'Time for the people of Mankato to remove all of the fascist school board members' one person tweeted.

'Payback is a b**** , right fascist Mankato MN school board dictator Jodi Sapp? You forced a parent to reveal their address so they could be doxxed & harassed. Hopefully people feel free to contact you now too,' another wrote.

'Looks like Mankato School Board needs a house cleaning. They forget that they work for the people of Mankato. I would suggest they start their house cleaning with that Jodi person,' a third person tweeted.

'In what universe is it okay to treat parents this way?! The school board works for the parents, not the other way around. Mankato parents need to start a recall petition for any school board member who support this kind of treatment of parents,' another critic of the school board wrote.

'None of the Board members list their home addresses on the Meet the Board site,' one person tweeted, while providing a link to the website. 

Meanwhile on Wednesday, Garland defended his memo which responded to threats aimed at school officials, while pushing back on criticism from Senate Republicans at a Judiciary Committee hearing.

The memo, Garland said, 'responds to concerns about violence, threats of violence, other criminal conduct.'

'Looks like Mankato School Board needs a house cleaning. They forget that they work for the people of Mankato. I would suggest they start their house cleaning with that Jodi person'

'Looks like Mankato School Board needs a house cleaning. They forget that they work for the people of Mankato. I would suggest they start their house cleaning with that Jodi person'

'Payback is a b**** , right fascist Mankato MN school board dictator Jodi Sapp? You forced a parent to reveal their address so they could be doxxed & harassed' one person tweeted

'Payback is a b**** , right fascist Mankato MN school board dictator Jodi Sapp? You forced a parent to reveal their address so they could be doxxed & harassed' one person tweeted

'Time for the people of Mankata to remove all of the fascist school board members' another tweeted

'Time for the people of Mankata to remove all of the fascist school board members' another tweeted

'None of the Board members list their home addresses on the Meet the Board site,' a third wrote

'None of the Board members list their home addresses on the Meet the Board site,' a third wrote

'In what universe is it okay to treat parents this way?! The school board works for the parents, not the other way around,' another person tweeted

'In what universe is it okay to treat parents this way?! The school board works for the parents, not the other way around,' another person tweeted

'That's all it's about, and all it asks, is for federal law enforcement to consult with, meet with local law enforcement to assess the circumstances, strategize about what may or may not be necessary to provide federal assistance, if it is necessary,' Garland said in response to a question from Republican Senator Chuck Grassley. 

Grassley's fellow Republican Senator Tom Cotton tore into Garland during testimony, telling him to 'resign in disgrace.'

'Thank God you are not on the Supreme Court,' the Arkansas Republican said, bringing up the touchy subject of Garland's failed confirmation to the high court in 2016. President Obama appointed him and then-Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked his confirmation because it was an election year.

'You should resign in disgrace,' Cotton told Garland.

The senator was questioning Garland over a directive the Justice Department issued earlier this month promising more law enforcement resources for schools amid a rise in tensions and threats at school board meetings over matters like critical race theory, coronavirus precautions and transgender bathroom policies.

Cotton asked about a Loudoun County father who was dragged out of a school board meeting and arrested as he tried to tell the room his 15-year-old daughter had been raped by a boy dressed in a skirt at Stone Bridge High School in the girls' bathroom.

Scott Smith says Loudoun County schools went out of their way to protect the child - 'a sexual predator'. The school, which Smith accused of covering up the incident to protect its new policy allowing students to use the bathroom they identify with, still has not commented.

The incident reportedly took place on May 28 and Scott was arrested on June 22.

Two months after the incident, the boy - who has not been named because he is a juvenile - was arrested for forced sodomy.

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