Japan just flattened their biggest covid curve yet, and they did so by legalizing and using ivermectin. In almost every country, infection rates and daily death records have increased with each new wave of sickness. The public health advice of lockdowns, isolation, mask mandates and mass inoculation programs has only continued to cause larger curves of sickness and hospitalization. The withholding of viable treatments, a crime against humanity, has all but crippled humanity’s ability to adapt to and recover from respiratory infections. But there’s hope in Japan, where ivermectin has been deployed to help people recover from covid-19 so they can have more durable, lasting immunity.

Japan is wary of vaccine companies, more aware of the damage they cause to human life

When it comes to trusting vaccine companies, Japan is one of the most cautious nations in the world. When the first covid-19 vaccines came out, Japan waited two additional months before offering the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine to the public. Historically, the Japanese are quicker to acknowledge vaccine injuries and will move more swiftly to protect the public from poisonous shots.

For example, Japan recommends the fewest number of vaccine doses to infants under one year of age. Not coincidentally, Japan also has the third lowest infant mortality rate among all developed nations. This isn’t a mere correlation. In fact, a study of thirty-four developed nations finds that infant mortality rates regress against the number of vaccine doses routinely given.

Pandemic not nullified by vaccines

Before Japan released the Pfizer covid vaccines to the public, the country was still struggling to come up with a treatment plan and even recorded over 9,000 new infections in early January. Over one hundred deaths were recorded on February 4th, as governments put pressure on Japan to come up with a vaccine campaign. As the vaccines were rolled out, COVID seemed to fade away for a month or two. However, by May 12, infections were peaking again, with over 7,000 new infections recorded. By May 25th, the nation recorded over one hundred deaths in a single day.

By the time July rolled around, the number of shots administered daily rose to about 1.5 million per day. By the end of the August, close to 70 percent of the Japanese population had lined up to get their shots. However, the high vaccination rate showed negative results. On August 20, 2020, when there were no vaccinations, there were 832 new infections. A year later, after most of the population was vaccinated, there were 22,301 new infections on August 22, 2021! The number of recorded deaths in August 2021 was, on average, five times higher each day, when compared to the year before — when there were no vaccines.

Ivermectin helps flatten Japan’s largest covid curve

The vaccine-induced pandemic could have spiraled out of control, but Japan decided to do something different than the U.S. and other failing nations that depend solely on vaccines and masks. In September, the nation deployed ivermectin and began treating patients with more dignity. Caseloads plummeted rapidly. In Tokyo, there were nearly 6,000 cases in the middle of August. By the end of September, the caseload had fallen well below one hundred, an 11-month low. The Associated Press tried to heap praise on vaccines and masks for the sudden success, even though these materials had statistically failed the nation for over a year, leading to massive waves of covid and other diseases.

As more Japanese were properly treated and recovered, the number of covid tests used by the Japanese fell by one third. The positivity rate of these tests also fell from 25% in late August to 1% in mid-October. Ivermectin has helped bring about a more rapid recovery, reducing the spread and imparting more durable immunity. Since its use, Japan has made a serious turnaround, in the midst of their most serious outbreak yet. This doesn’t mean that Japan is in the clear just yet, because vaccine efficacy will inevitably wane, causing new waves of covid in the months ahead. The difference when next time rolls around: Japan has hope with a better treatment plan.

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