Six of the seven people who recently died from the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) in the eastern Australian state of New South Wales were vaccinated.

On Tuesday, Sept. 28, New South Wales Deputy Chief Health Officer Dr. Marianne Gale announced that the state recorded seven new COVID 19-related deaths overnight. Gale made this announcement during a press conference with members of the state government, including Minister for Health and Medical Research Brad Hazzard of the ruling Liberal Party.

“As the minister said, tragically today, we announce the deaths of seven people who have lost their lives to COVID-19, four women and three men,” said Gale. “One person was not vaccinated. Three people had received one dose of a COVID vaccine and three people had received two doses of a COVID vaccine.”

Gale tried to argue that their deaths were not a sign that the COVID-19 vaccines do not work. She said all of the seven individuals had underlying health conditions, and she tried to argue that their age made them more susceptible to the virus. One person was in their 40s, another in their 50s, two were in their 70s, two in their 80s and the last person who died was in their 90s.

The health officer further tried to argue that some of the vaccinated people who died got infected with COVID-19 just days after they received their doses.

“So we know in a number of cases, unfortunately, the vaccine didn’t have enough time to provide the protection that we would have wanted,” said Gale.

The health officer ended her statement by urging people to get vaccinated.

“We know that vaccines are highly effective at preventing hospitalizations and death,” claimed Gale. “And so if you haven’t already done so, please, please do book in for your vaccination.”

New South Wales government still pushing residents to get vaccinated

During the same press conference, New South Wales government ministers announced that the state had just hit a full vaccination rate of 60.4 percent. The government recently announced that some of the state’s coronavirus restrictions will be rolled back once the state hits a 70 percent full vaccination rate. Estimates suggest this will happen by Oct. 11.

Gale’s boss, Hazzard, tried to urge state residents to keep getting vaccinated, claiming that vaccinations were the only “way out of this.”

“You need to go and get vaccinated as quickly as possible. You’re kidding yourself if you think you don’t need to get vaccinated, because it may well be you that gets the virus and dies, or ends up in a hospital ICU,” said Hazzard. “It may be you that passes on the virus to your family or your friends and see the responsibility then fall upon your shoulders for the death of one of your close friends or family.”

Hazzard then went on to attack New South Wales residents who were skeptical about taking the rushed, experimental and deadly COVID-19 vaccines. He claimed some of them were just waiting for a particular type of vaccine, which is why many do not want to take the ones already available in Australia.

“There’s been a little bit of pickiness and choosiness,” said Hazzard. “When you’re going to have your flu shot, you don’t ask what brand it is. We never have. Go and have the vaccine that’s available because whatever vaccine is available is the best one to keep you safe.” 

During the same conference, Hazzard announced increased lockdown restrictions for two local government areas in New South Wales that had an uptick in new COVID-19 cases. Those two areas had plans to come out of lockdown.

Hazzard also announced that there may be further restrictions on three other local government areas.

“These decisions are not made lightly,” said Hazzard. “There’s more work to do and the public health team will do that work.”

The seven new deaths put the state’s total number of coronavirus-related deaths during this post-vaccine outbreak at 316. Before the proliferation of vaccines, the state only recorded 56 deaths due to COVID-19.

No comments:

Post a Comment