The U.S. Army National Guard is recruiting for a job position described as “Internment/Resettlement Specialist” at the same time the Department of Homeland Security is putting out alerts on “potential terrorist threats” that appear to equate Americans opposing government Covid measures with foreign terrorists who attacked America on 9/11.

NBC News on Friday, Aug. 13, issued a “breaking news” report that Homeland Security had put out the new terrorism alert.

The DHS alert encourages Americans to “report threats of violence, including online threats, to local law enforcement, FBI field offices, or local Fusion Center.”

Even spreading a so-called “conspiracy theory” can place you on the government watchlist, according to the DHS terror alert, which states:

“DHS will continue to identify and evaluate calls for violence, including online activity associated with the spread of disinformation, conspiracy theories, and false narratives, by known or suspected threat actors and provide updated information, as necessary.”

In a help-wanted ad posted to the National Guard’s website it is looking for men and women between the ages of 17 and 35 and in good physical shape to serve in its military police units as internment and resettlement specialists.

The E31 classification jobs will involve working in “Search/Restraint.”

Under “Some of the Skills You’ll Learn,” the posting with a job location listed as Washington, D.C. gives the following information.

OVERVIEW

Internment/resettlement specialists are primarily responsible for day-to-day operations in a military confinement/correctional facility or detention/internment facility.

JOB DUTIES

  • Supervision of confinement and detention operations
  • External security to facilities
  • Counseling/guidance to individual prisoners within a rehabilitative program
  • Records of prisoners/internees and their programs

It should not be assumed these positions are for overseas detention facilities.

The U.S. Army published a 326-page training manual on February 12, 2010, on how to detain civilians, which included a clear description of detention camps that could be established here in the U.S. homeland.

The document, coded FM 3-39.40 and titled Internment and Resettlement Operations includes foreign and domestic detention of what it calls Civil Internees or CIs.

Section 2-39 of the 2010 document reads:

“Civil Support is the DOD [Department of Defense] support to U.S. civil authorities for domestic emergencies, and for designated law enforcement and other agencies. Civil support includes operations that address the consequences of natural or man-made disasters, accidents, terrorist attacks and incidents in the U.S. and its territories.”

In section 2-40, the document further defines the role of Internment and Resettlement operations, called I/R, as follows:

“The I/R tasks performed in support of civil support operations are similar to those during combat operations, but the techniques and procedures are modified based on the special OE associated with operating within U.S. territory and according to the categories of individuals [primarily DCs] to be housed in I/R facilities.”

The document describes the internment camps in great detail, including searches of detainees, how to silence them through the use of facemasks and stuffing muffling objects into their mouths, etc.

Following is a quote directly from the document, in Section 3-56, describing the duties of a “Psychological Operations Officer.”

  • Develops PSYOP products that are designed to pacify and acclimate detainees or DCs to accept U.S. I/R facility authority and regulations.
  • Gains the cooperation of detainees or DCs to reduce the number of guards needed.
  • Identifies malcontents, trained agitators, and political leaders within the facility who may try to organize resistance or create disturbances.
  • Develops and executes indoctrination programs to reduce or remove antagonistic attitudes.
  • Identifies political activists.
  • Provides loudspeaker support [such as administrative announcements and facility instructions when necessary].
  • Helps the military police commander control detainee and DC populations during emergencies.
  • Plans and executes a PSYOP program that produces an understanding and appreciation of U.S. policies and actions.

Upon capture, the document says “soldiers process detainees using the ‘search, silence, segregate, speed, safeguard, and tag [5 Ss and a T]’ technique. This technique provides a structure to guide soldiers in conducting detainee operations until they transfer custody of detainees to another authority or location.

The first three “Ss” are described as follows:

Search. Neutralize a detainee and confiscate weapons, personal items, and terms of potential intelligence and/or evidentiary value.

Silence. Prevent detainees from communicating with one another or making audible clamor such as chanting, singing, or praying. Silence uncooperative detainees by muffling them with a soft, clean cloth tied around their mouths and fastened at the backs of their heads. Do not use duct tape or other adhesives, place a cloth or either objects inside the mouth, or apply physical force to silence detainees.

Segregate. Segregate detainees according to policy and SOPs [segregation requirements differ from operation to operation]

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