Pfizer has offered a glimpse of its intended timeline for authorization of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine in children as young as six months old.

Frank D’Amelio, Pfizer’s chief financial officer, says the company hoped to “go file” for that particular age group in November. The timeline will depend on the findings of in-house trials looking into whether the vaccines are safe and effective in children aged six months to five years.

“We would expect to have data for children between the ages of six months and five years old that we would file with the FDA [Food and Drug Administration],” says D’Amelio at the Morgan Stanley Global Healthcare Conference. “I’ll call it in the weeks shortly after the filing of the data for the six- to 11-year-olds.”

Pfizer is currently pushing to get emergency use authorization from the FDA for the COVID-19 vaccine to be given in children aged six to 11 by October.

Big Pharma companies continue to insist that children need to get vaccinated despite the fact that they have accounted for less than 0.25 percent of all COVID-19 deaths in states that report pediatric cases. Seven states have reported no child deaths, while other states have reported that children made up as low as 0.03 percent of all fatalities.

The Pfizer vaccine for the youngest age group is less potent than the others. Children aged between six months and five years old are given a 3 microgram vaccine during clinical trials, compared with 10 micrograms for those aged five to 11 and 30 micrograms for adults.

The plan to vaccinate children as young as six months old is expected to cause international controversy.

Surprisingly, some parents are already seeking out COVID-19 vaccine trials for their children. Rachael DiFransico has enrolled her 14-month-old daughter Sybil in a study testing whether a COVID-19 vaccine works safely in children.

“This trial is our best shot at getting the vaccine as quickly as possible,” said Ms. DiFransico, who said she wanted Sybil to be able to spend more time with other children and extended family. “We want some semblance of normalcy for her.” 

More than 3,000 families have contacted Vanderbilt University Medical Center to volunteer for about 150 slots in Moderna’s pediatric trial.

Children are more likely to get myocarditis from vaccine than getting hospitalized with COVID-19

Those parents and families probably don’t know that children are more likely to get a lifelong disease from COVID-19 vaccine than falling seriously ill with the disease.

Preliminary trials of the Pfizer vaccine for teenage children and young adults have shown that there is less than 1 in 10,000 risk of having heart inflammation known as myocarditis.

Meanwhile, the latest official data from the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) shows that COVID-19 hospitalization rate among children between 5 and 17 years old is just 0.9 per 100,000 (0.09 per 10,000). Data also shows that their hospitalization rate is way below the 14.8 per 100,000 (1.48 per 10,000) among the highly-vaccinated over-65 age group.

While the age groups are not exactly identical, it is clear that children are much safer without the vaccine. And contrary to what members of the mainstream media say, myocarditis does not go away easily.

No case of myocarditis is “mild”

A cardiologist who treated a child suffering from myocarditis after getting vaccinated against COVID-19 has said that “no case of myocarditis is mild.”

Fourteen-year-old Aiden Jo received his first dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine on May 12. On June 10, he woke up in the middle of the night complaining of chest pain and difficulty breathing. The boy’s mother, Emily, rushed him to the hospital where he was ultimately treated for myocarditis. Emily said she had been under the impression that the adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccines are rare and mild.

“What they didn’t explain is that mild means hospital care and follow-up care indefinitely,” she told activist group Children’s Health Defense.

“They’re not explaining what mild myocarditis means. Aiden’s cardiologist told us no case of myocarditis is mild.  That’s like saying a heart attack is mild.”

Aiden is now forced to sit out gym activities, skip recess and avoid running around and playing outside with his friends due to how easily he gets tired and how poorly his heart can handle the stress of activity.  His mother also faces thousands of dollars in medical care. 

Myocarditis reduces your heart’s ability to pump and can cause rapid or abnormal heartbeats. Severe cases of myocarditis can lead to heart attack, stroke, heart failure and sudden cardiac arrest. Signs of myocarditis in children include chest pain, breathing problems, abnormal heartbeats, rapid breathing, fever and fainting.

Children can get better immunity from catching COVID-19

Experts say children can get better immunity from catching the virus naturally instead of getting one dose of a vaccine.

Professor David Livermore, a microbiologist at the University of East Anglia, claims that it is “pretty pointless” to vaccinate children who face such a small risk of falling seriously ill with COVID-19.

According to Livermore, children are likely to develop more protection from catching the virus in a similar way as to how they build up immunity against other seasonal illnesses.

COVID-19 vaccines work by teaching the immune system to recognize the virus and give it the power to fight it off in the future.

But some studies have suggested vaccine-triggered immunity starts to wane within six months, while some studies have shown that people who have recovered from the virus may be protected for a longer period.

Researchers in a study conducted in Israel have found that people who get the vaccine are more likely to catch COVID-19 than those who have recovered from a previous infection.

People given two doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine are almost six times more likely to contract a delta infection and seven times more likely to have symptomatic disease than those who recovered. “This analysis demonstrated that natural immunity affords longer-lasting and stronger protection against infection, symptomatic disease and hospitalization due to the delta variant,” the researchers say.

The analysis has also shown that protection from an earlier infection wanes with time. The risk of a vaccine-breakthrough delta case is 13 times higher than the risk of developing a second infection when the original illness occurred during January or February 2021.

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