The laughably non-essential Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has put out a new “inclusive communications” guide that orders Americans to start talking about health through a more tolerant “health equity lens.”

Calling people with disabilities “disabled,” for instance, is no longer acceptable, nor is calling people who smoke “smokers.” Identifying those who commit crimes as “criminal” is also off-limits, as is referring to people who use wheelchairs as “handicapped.”

“The following provides some preferred terms for select population groups; the terms to try to use represent an ongoing shift toward non-stigmatizing language,” the guide states.

“Health equity is intersectional,” it adds. “This means that individuals belong to more than one group and, therefore, may have overlapping health and social inequities, as well as overlapping strengths and assets.”

What do you call someone who crosses the border illegally? Hopefully not an “illegal immigrant” or an “illegal alien,” which the CDC says is offensive.

“The term ‘alien’ (person who is not a citizen of the United States) may be stigmatizing in some contexts and should only be used in technical documents and when referring to or using immigration law terminology,” the guide explains.

“Non-U.S.-born or foreign-born persons may also be used to refer to individuals born in a country other than the U.S., similar to the international migrant concept.”

Now that the CDC has gone woke, can it finally go broke and disappear already?

As for people who live on the streets, calling them “homeless” is also unacceptable to the CDC. Instead, you should call them “persons experiencing unstable housing / housing insecurity / persons who are not securely housed” – talk about a mouthful!

People without health insurance should likewise not be referred to as “uninsured,” but rather as “people who are medically underserved.”

If someone is addicted to drugs, the CDC would prefer that you refer to him or her as a person “with substance use disorder.” The same goes for alcoholics, who are better described, according to the CDC, as “persons with alcohol use disorder.”

Calling someone “vulnerable” for any reason at all is also offensive, according to the CDC. While some individuals prefer “to use identity-first terminology,” such as pronoun-obsessed LGBTQ cult members, others would rather be identified in more human terms.

As for poor people and the poverty-stricken, the CDC wants Americans to downplay this by referencing such people as “people with lower incomes” or “people with self-reported income in the lowest income bracket (if income brackets are defined).”

“People experiencing poverty” is preferable to calling them “underserved,” in this context, though underserved can be used in other contexts, according to the CDC.

It is a lot to remember, especially when what is considered “acceptable” is constantly changing. The CDC promised all this late last year, however, when it decided that being “woke” was more important than being scientific.

There really is no more legitimate purpose for the CDC’s existence, it turns out. When this type of garbage becomes its priority, you know that the CDC has long overstayed its welcome in our country and desperately needs to be defunded and abolished.

“Instead of illegal aliens, call them criminal invaders,” joked one commenter at Headline USA.

“Actually, I have been referring to the illegals as ‘hostile alien invaders’ for a good number of years,” responded another.

“Maybe, just maybe, the CDC should focus more on fighting real diseases and finding effective, science-based treatments and methods to treat health conditions rather than trying to control what we say and do,” wrote yet another.

No comments:

Post a Comment