New York City's population has jumped to a whopping 8.8 million after the Big Apple gained more residents over the last decade thank many other major cities combined. 

From 2010 to 2020, it welcomed 629,057 new New Yorkers to the five boroughs, more than the total number of people who moved to Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas and Phoenix during the same period.

The newest data, compiled during the worst of the COVID-19 crisis last Spring, was release by the US Census Bureau released on Thursday.

Officials in the Big Apple had feared a population drop as the pandemic worsened, which could have affected federal aid, while New York City served as an unwanted epicenter. 

'Substantial and surprising,' said Steven Romalewski, an expert in city demographics at the CUNY’s Graduate Center. 

'It’s really impressive to see this kind of growth against the backdrop of the pandemic — and not only the claims that everyone was making about people leaving the city leaving the droves, but also collecting all the data during the pandemic.'

People are seen walking through Times Square in New York, where a 7.7 percent increase in population from 2010 to 2020 made the total jump to 8.8 million

People are seen walking through Times Square in New York, where a 7.7 percent increase in population from 2010 to 2020 made the total jump to 8.8 million

People with and without masks walk on a crowded boardwalk at Coney Island on Memorial Day in the Brooklyn Borough of New York on May 31

People with and without masks walk on a crowded boardwalk at Coney Island on Memorial Day in the Brooklyn Borough of New York on May 31


The surge in New York's population amounts to a 7.7 percent increase, a figure helping to dispel theories that the pandemic would take a permanent, and big, bite out of the Big Apple. 

'I’m surprised — very surprised by that. I thought the flow of population was heading out,' Mike C., an actor who lives in Brooklyn, told New York Post.

The outlet reports that the other top ten US cities saw increases in their respective populations, none of which came close to the spike in New York City.

After Gotham, Houston saw 205,000 new faces move to the city over the same time frame, with the populations of Los Angeles increasing by 106,000 people and Dallas by 107,000. 

Meanwhile, Philadelphia, the only other northeast city besides New York to break into the top ten, picked up a far more modest 78,000.

And while Chicago gained a meager 54,000 people over that ten year period, bringing the total population to 2.7 million, the figure is far more impressive considering the city was losing residents a decade ago.  

As for the five boroughs, Brooklyn remains the fastest-growing in New York, seeing a 9.2 percent increase of 231,374 new residents from 2010 to last year, making the overall borough population 2.7 million, making Brooklyn the same size as Chicago population-wise.

The next fastest-growing borough was Queens, which increased by 174,742 people to bring the total population to 2.4 million.  

Shoppers enjoy Manhattan, as new figures show that New York's population rocketed by close to 700,000 in the last decade

Shoppers enjoy Manhattan, as new figures show that New York's population rocketed by close to 700,000 in the last decade 

Perhaps most unsurprisingly, Staten Island remains the city's slowest growing borough, with the smallest borough in New York only adding 27,012 new residents to the island. The population is now 496,000 after the modest 5.8 increase. 

'People are always going to come to New York. It’s not one of those cities that dies, you know,' Brooklynite Nick Ambro told the Post.

'Many bad things have happened to this city, and it still kept going.'

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