Scientists have spoken out against the White House’s decision to allow fully vaccinated Americans to get booster doses of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines.

The White House recently announced on Wednesday, Aug. 18, that starting Sept. 20 everyone over the age of 18 who has been fully vaccinated with either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines will be eligible to receive a third dose eight months after their second dose.

Public health officials tried to justify giving third doses of the experimental and side effect-riddled COVID-19 vaccines using several studies recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These studies suggest that the so-called protection the vaccines give against COVID-19 diminishes after several months.

“Taken together, you can see that while the exact percentage of vaccine effectiveness over time differs depending on the cohort and settings study, the data consistently demonstrate a reduction of vaccine effectiveness against infection over time,” claimed CDC Director Rochelle Walensky. 

But the CDC’s own data shows that COVID-19 is still dangerous for fully vaccinated individuals.

One of the studies released by the CDC showed that, for one part of New York, there were 9,675 infections among fully vaccinated adults. Of these breakthrough COVID-19 cases, roughly 15 percent – or 1,271 people – were hospitalized.

Listen to this special Situation Update episode of the Health Ranger Report, a podcast by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, as he talks about how public health authorities like the CDC are pushing for people to take the booster doses immediately to accelerate their plans.

Scientists believe booster doses are not necessary

One of those scientists criticizing the White House for its decision is Dr. Anna Durbin, a professor of international health at Johns Hopkins University. She believes the push to allow booster doses of the COVID-19 vaccines is not based on scientific evidence but rather on fear and panic regarding the post-vaccine variants.

She added that she believes her colleagues in medicine are themselves contributing to this panic about the variants, notably regarding the delta variant.

“I think there’s this tidal wave building that’s based on anxiety,” said Durbin. “And I don’t think it’s based on scientific evidence that a booster is needed.”

“I don’t think the data indicates that booster shots are needed,” she added. “Booster shots are not going to stop the spread of delta.”

Unfortunately, Durbin’s objection to booster doses lies in the mistaken belief that the COVID-19 vaccines work well enough against the variants.

Durbin believes that just because the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines may decrease over time, this does not necessarily mean that the vaccines are failing.

“We cannot keep boosting and say, ‘we’re going to prevent colds in everybody,'” she said.

“It’s important to understand that vaccines are not designed to prevent infection. They’re designed to prevent you from getting seriously ill,” claimed Durbin. “People are still highly protected against severe disease, hospitalization and death. This is what vaccines are supposed to do.”

Durbin believes the actual solution is not to give booster doses to Americans, but for public health authorities to vaccinate more people.

“They have to vaccinate everyone in the world,” she said. Durbin even believes that the United States should take its stockpile of vaccines and distribute it to other countries. For example, Durbin suggested providing some COVID-19 vaccines to Haiti, where less than 0.1 percent of the population is fully vaccinated.

Despite Durbin’s assertion that the COVID-19 vaccines work, the CDC’s own data attempting to justify the use of booster doses proves her wrong.

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