White House Chief Medical Advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said on Sunday, Aug. 15, that the United States is “absolutely prepared” to “very quickly” offer third doses of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines.

This is building on a previous pronouncement by the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Thursday that individuals with compromised immune systems are eligible for a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

“So, if it turns out as the data comes in, we see we do need to give an additional dose to people in nursing homes or people who are elderly, we will be absolutely prepared to do that very quickly,” said Fauci during an appearance on mainstream media outlet CBS. “We are planning for and looking ahead.”

About three percent of adults in the U.S. are immunocompromised due to a variety of factors, including previous encounters with certain cancers, diseases and disorders and due to an organ transplant.

So-called public health experts pushing for additional COVID-19 vaccine doses

The issue of extra doses or booster doses of COVID-19 has become much more mainstream due to the spread of the post-vaccine delta variant of the coronavirus.

Public health authorities and so-called public health experts like Fauci have been pushing to require booster doses to the rest of the population, not just the immunocompromised. This is a step towards requiring even more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine in the future under the guise of keeping up people’s supposed vaccine-acquired immunity to the virus.

When asked about if and when the rest of the population will receive additional doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, Fauci said federal health officials were “looking at it on a daily and weekly basis in cohorts, not only in the U.S. but in other countries, to determine if, when and to whom we should be giving [additional doses].”

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), said the agency still has not decided whether or not to mandate third or other additional doses of the COVID-19 vaccines.

Collins claimed without evidence that this is because the NIH still believes fully vaccinated people are protected against COVID-19, including against the post-vaccine delta variant. This ignores the fact that the CDC’s own data shows vaccinated people with the delta variant release similar viral loads to unvaccinated people.

But despite this, Collins admitted that the NIH is concerned that the so-called effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccines may wane “over months.”

“And delta is a nasty one for us to try to deal with,” he said. “The combination of those two means we may need boosters, maybe beginning first with healthcare providers, as well as people in nursing homes,  and then gradually moving forward.”

Without a recommendation or a mandate for additional COVID-19 vaccines, Fauci has suggested stronger mandates to get people fully vaccinated and to get them to keep wearing masks in public.

“We really have to all pull together to get on top of this otherwise we’re going to continue to suffer as we’re seeing right now,” said Fauci. He has in the past advocated for vaccine mandates in education and business. He argued these mandates should be passed and all concerns regarding personal liberties should be ignored because “we have a common enemy, and that common enemy is the virus.” 

The administration of President Joe Biden has around 100 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines stockpiled. It is already drawing up plans to deliver these doses to many Americans, with the first doses to be delivered as early as this fall.

When the mandate or recommendation for additional COVID-19 vaccine doses comes, the government will be ready.

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