Protesters showed up at the home of Los Angeles Democratic Mayor Eric Garcetti on Thursday night hours after he signed a new anti-camping law that prohibits people from pitching tents near homeless shelters, daycare centers, schools, under- and overpasses, freeways, libraries, and parks.

According to the Los Angeles Police Department, the action started peacefully at about 7:30 p.m. with about 50 demonstrators. Hours later, officers in riot gear were reportedly deployed to disperse the crowd.

“No one was in danger. Our role last night was to facilitate a peaceful protest and make sure that everyone’s First Amendment rights were protected,” said LAPD Lt. Rex Ingram, per CBSLA. “Unfortunately around midnight, they were a little bit loud and boisterous, and were getting a little out of hand, and that’s why we decided to give them a dispersal order.”

Police made no arrests and said there were no confrontations.

According to CBSLA, “some damage was left to the property, including vulgar graffiti on the outer pillars that were covered up with paper to be cleaned up later Friday morning.” Lt. Ingram told the outlet there was also “a bunch of toilet paper on the trees” and that a felony vandalism investigation was underway.

Damage also included broken windows, a report broadcast on KFI radio said.

Video from the scene appeared to show protesters taunting police officers.

The Los Angeles Daily News reported, “Protesters called on Garcetti to rescind his signature and to veto the ordinance, a move that remains unlikely as all but two of the 15 City Council members voted in favor of the law.”

More details from The L.A. Daily News:

Water bottles and snacks were stacked alongside a speaker that played Lil Nas X’s new single, Industry Baby. Some protesters shinned flashlights onto the mansion, projecting silhouettes of people holding up the middle finger…

It was not known whether Garcetti was actually home Thursday evening. Garcetti signed the anti-camping law just weeks after President Joe Biden tapped the mayor to work as ambassador to India.

Homeless advocates claim the new restrictions “criminalize” homelessness. An analysis by UCLA researchers estimated that camping could be off-limits in at least 40% of the city under the new policy. They concluded that transients could have difficulties complying with the law due to a lack of housing and shelters in L.A.

The ordinance also bans occupying space within ten feet of a driveway, five feet of a building entrance or exit, or two feet of any fire hydrant. In addition, the new rules limit the role of law enforcement and rely on voluntary compliance from transients.

The two councilmembers that opposed the measure, Mike Bonin and Nithya Raman, are the targets of recall drives seeking to remove them from office primarily over their approaches to homelessness and crime.

The ordinance goes into effect in late August.

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