This week, Michaela Kennedy-Cuomo — daughter of Democratic New York Governor Andrew Cuomo — announced that she is “demisexual.”

And what does “demisexual” mean, you may ask?

According to “LGBTA Wiki,” which we must assume is an authority on such nonsense, demisexual is “a sexual orientation on the asexual spectrum defined as someone who does not experience sexual attraction until they have formed a deep emotional connection with someone.”

“The connection can be romantic, platonic, or some other form of connection,” the site adds. “Forming an emotional bond with someone does not mean that one is automatically attracted to said person, as it just means there’s now a possibility for one to feel attraction.”

So being a “demisexual” means that you can only develop some form of emotional connection with someone — whether it be “romantic, platonic, or some other form of connection” — when you have formed an emotional connection…

This is what is known as a tautological statement, a statement that is true in every possible way. It is the LGBTA equivalent of “the brown dog is brown.”

In other words, it’s quite literally meaningless.

But then why is “demisexual” even defined as a sexual orientation, and why does it have its own flag, a strangely diluted and non-aesthetically pleasing rebranding of the South African flag?

Because membership of a minority victim group has become so attractive that demonstrable non-victims have to invent nonsensical categories which allow them admission under the ever-expanding LGBTQ+ banner.

Kennedy-Cuomo, arguably among the most privileged members of our society by nature of her surname alone, seemingly has a deep and narcissistic need to be a victim. But, unfortunately for Kennedy-Cuomo, she’s just a privileged woman who isn’t a member of one of the “real” victim groups. Luckily for her, there’s an app for that.

This absurd story raises two serious questions. First, where does this end? Second, what does it say about society more broadly?

The ending to this selfish desire for self-victimhood is inevitable: every single individual will have their own category. Each person will have their own flag, and these flags will combine under a colossal umbrella of a society of victims, with an ever-increasing application of specificity to one’s unimportant characteristics. The result will be a strange form of individualism, in which our value as individuals is meaningless beyond the meaningless variables we retroactively create to “describe” ourselves.

The question “what does it say about society more broadly” is comparatively simple: Our culture is so monumentally successful in terms of fundamental equality and opportunity that even the most privileged among us want to get in on the nationwide grift that is identity politics.

When people are clamoring to be “victims,” is a victim really a victim anymore?

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