President Joe Biden's administration will concede Tuesday that it will fall short of its goal of vaccinating 70% of adult Americans by July 4th but officials will still brag about the rate they are getting shots in the arms of Americans.

Administration officials will insist that - despite falling short of its Independence Day  mark - the White House has 'succeeded beyond our highest expectations' in returning the US to a pre-pandemic normal, NBC News reported. 

Jeffrey Zients, the head of the White House COVID response team, is expected to make the announcement at Tuesday's COVID team press briefing. 

But, in conceding the defeat, he will brag about how the administration has hit its 70% vaccination rate among Americans aged 30 and older, and likely to reach that threshold for those 27 and older by the Fourth of July.

But it will take 'a few extra weeks' to  get all adult Americans to that mark, Zients will acknowledge. 

He will blame a reluctance among young Americans to get vaccinated. 

'The reality is, many younger Americans have felt like COVID-19 is not something that impacts them and have been less eager to get the shot,' he plans to say, according to advance remarks obtained by NBC News. 

The new target date will be mid-July. Biden set his original July 4th goal on May 4th. 

For the administration, it's the first major benchmark it will missed. Biden has routinely bragged about hitting his goals - including 100 million shots in the first 100 days and reaching 300 million shots in 150 days. Critics called those early goals easily reached. 


Jeffrey Zients, the head of the White House COVID response team, is expected to announce the missed target in Tuesday's COVID team briefing to the press

Jeffrey Zients, the head of the White House COVID response team, is expected to announce the missed target in Tuesday's COVID team briefing to the press

Biden is danger of missing two major COVID targets in the coming weeks - the aforementioned 70% mark and sending 80 million vaccine doses worldwide by the end of June.

The president has touted a return to normalcy for Americans on Independence Day and is planning a massive gathering on the South Lawn of the White House to celebrate. 

President Joe Biden's administration will concede Tuesday that it will likely fall short of its goal of vaccinating 70% of adult Americans by July 4th

President Joe Biden's administration will concede Tuesday that it will likely fall short of its goal of vaccinating 70% of adult Americans by July 4th

But, as his plans roll forward for 1,000 essential workers and military families to join him at the White House while thousands more gather on the National Mall to watch a fireworks display, the vaccination rate in the US has slowed to a level that threatens to derail his target.

On Monday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki blamed the decreased vaccination rates in the United States on younger Americans and in particular geographic areas, such as the South.

Currently, 54% of the American population has had at least one shot of the COVID vaccine while 46% of the population is fully vaccinated, according to CDC data. The US has passed more than 600,000 deaths from the coronavirus. 

'First let me say we've made tremendous progress in our vaccination efforts to date,' Psaki said. 

She blamed the lower vaccination rate among 18-25-year-olds as the reason the overall vaccination rate is dropping.

'As we dig into the data, we know that what we're seeing is a lower rate among young people. That's concerning especially with the Delta variant being on the rise as it as it is, which does not discriminate by age, which still could cause death, serious illness,' she said. 

If the rate of adult vaccination continues on the seven-day average, the United States will come in just shy of Biden's target, with about 67 percent of adults partly vaccinated by the Fourth of July, according to a New York Times analysis. 

The administration also has bragged about its commitment to the global fight against COVID with its vaccine donations. On Monday it announced destinations for 55 million doses of the vaccine with focuses on Latin America, South American, Asia and Africa. 

On Monday the White House announced destinations for 55 million doses of the COVID vaccine with focuses on Latin America, South American, Asia and Africa

On Monday the White House announced destinations for 55 million doses of the COVID vaccine with focuses on Latin America, South American, Asia and Africa

But fewer than 10 million doses of the COVID vaccine have been shipped, including 2.5 million doses delivered to Taiwan over the weekend and about 1 million doses delivered to Mexico, Canada and South Korea earlier this month, the Associated Press found.

The White House has down played the possible missed deadlines. 

Psaki blamed logistical challenges for the delay in getting doses of the vaccine overseas, including customs, language barriers and shipping issues. 

'What we found to be the biggest challenge is not actually the supply. We have plenty of doses to share with the world, but this is a Herculean logistical challenge and we've seen that as we've begun to implement,' Psaki said at her press briefing on Monday.

'When we work with countries, we need to ensure that there's safety and regulatory information is shared. Some supply teams need needles, syringes and alcohol pads. Transportation needs teams need to ensure that there are proper temperature storage prep prevent breakage and ensure the vaccine immediately clears customs, so this has not as you all know, been done before. Sometimes it's even language barriers that occur as we're working to get these doses out to countries,' she said.  

Last week the World Health Organization warned that the global spread of the coronavirus is moving faster than worldwide distribution of the vaccine. 

More than 3.8 million people have died from COVID across the globe since the beginning of the pandemic.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said logistic problems have slowed vaccine shipments world wide and blamed the falling vaccination rate in the US on 18-25-year-olds

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said logistic problems have slowed vaccine shipments world wide and blamed the falling vaccination rate in the US on 18-25-year-olds

Psaki says supplying vaccines to the world is a 'Herculean challenge'
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The administration has made an all out push to hit is 70% vaccination goal by Independence Day. 

Vice President Kamala Harris kicked off a vaccination tour last week, making two Southern stops - in Greenville, South Carolina, and Atlanta.

Jill Biden will make a series of Southern stops this week - Jackson, Mississippi and Nashville, Tennessee on Tuesday and Kissimmee and Tampa, Florida, on Thursday.

Second gentleman Doug Emhoff will be in Illinois on Wednesday. 

And President Biden will visit a vaccination clinic in Raleigh, North Carolina, on Thursday.   

The White House also has tried to entice young people to get a shot by offering free beer, free ride sharing and noting your vaccination status on your dating app.  


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